boyirl:

FISMOLL “Let’s Play Birds”

"Come on look into the expanse
And breath all these around
Come on don’t be afraid to look
Don’t be afraid to look at distance”

s-e-a-soul:

ambermozo:

be with someone who will stop what they are doing to kiss you. Life gets crazy and busy and things happen and in the middle of it, i think its important to be with someone who can calm you and remember to make you feel loved. 

this is the fucking cutest pic eveeeer

s-e-a-soul:

ambermozo:

be with someone who will stop what they are doing to kiss you. Life gets crazy and busy and things happen and in the middle of it, i think its important to be with someone who can calm you and remember to make you feel loved. 

this is the fucking cutest pic eveeeer

feministbatwoman:

huffingtonpost:

Columbia University Student Will Drag Her Mattress Around Campus Until Her Rapist Is Gone

"I think the act of carrying something that is normally found in our bedroom out into the light is supposed to mirror the way I’ve talked to the media and talked to different news channels, etc," Emma continues in the full video which you can watch here. 

So, I just want to go into HOW MUCH Columbia and the NYPD has failed, and revictimized, Emma Sulkowitz.

In her school hearing, Sulkowitz ” had to explain to the three administrators on the panel how anal rape worked. She told them she had been hit across the face, choked and pinned down, but, she said, one still seemed confused about how it was possible for someone to penetrate her there without lubricant. Sulkowicz said she had to draw them a diagram.”

"Her best friend was meant to be at the hearing; Sulkowicz had chosen her as her one “supporter.” But her friend was kicked out of that role for talking about the case, according to Sulkowicz, in violation of the university’s confidentiality policy. As punishment, her friend was also put on probation and made to write two reflection papers: one from the perspective of Sulkowicz and another from the accused."

FROM THE PERSPECTIVE
OF HER FRIEND’S RAPIST

- Two other women at Columbia have accused this guy of sexual assault/rape. But he’s been found not responsible in all instances, and is still on campus

- When she went to the police, one officer said: “”You invited him into your room. That’s not the legal definition of rape.”

- Another officer told her friends, who came with her: ““For every single rape I’ve had, I’ve had 20 that are total bull——,” he added. “It’s also my type of job to get to the truth. If that means being harsh about it, that’s what I do.”

And that’s.
Why.
People.
Don’t.
REPORT.

I want to set literally everything on fire.

rubyetc:

I am the neatest packer and clearest thinker in the world

schuettelndekoepfe:

al-tracey:

"Love is a little bit like drinking coffee."

ich trinke keinen Kaffee

schuettelndekoepfe:

al-tracey:

"Love is a little bit like drinking coffee."

ich trinke keinen Kaffee

ellusivity:

harrisonjamie:

I love that the boys added this! 
The block 2014


I love the boys

ellusivity:

harrisonjamie:

I love that the boys added this! 

The block 2014

I love the boys

ost-kreuz:

nevver:

Design Crush

one of my favorite quotes ever

ost-kreuz:

nevver:

Design Crush

one of my favorite quotes ever

monicaalex:

want a man who has no social networks

For whatever we lose
(a you or a me)
it’s always ourselves
we find in the sea.
 - E.E. Cummings

theenergyissue:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.